Vocabulary

Learn New Words FAST with this Lesson’s Vocab Review List

Get this lesson’s key vocab, their translations and pronunciations. Sign up for your Free Lifetime Account Now and get 7 Days of Premium Access including this feature.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Notes

Unlock In-Depth Explanations & Exclusive Takeaways with Printable Lesson Notes

Unlock Lesson Notes and Transcripts for every single lesson. Sign Up for a Free Lifetime Account and Get 7 Days of Premium Access.

Or sign up using Facebook
Already a Member?

Lesson Transcript

Hi!
Welcome to Introduction to Arabic.
My name is Alisha and I'm joined by...
Hi everyone! I'm Yafa.
In this lesson, we'll focus on teaching you the most useful Arabic words and phrases for absolute beginners!
Make sure you're repeating the words out loud after I say the examples!
Are you ready? Let's get started!
The best phrase to learn when studying a new language is one that expresses gratitude and appreciation. If you had to learn only a single phrase, this would be it!
We taught you this phrase in the first lesson of this series. Do you remember what it was?
شكرًا
It means "Thank you."
شكرًا
Shukran
Keep repeating after Yafa until you get it!
شكرًا
Shukran
Your turn!
شكرًا
Shukran
شكرًا
Shukran
OK. One last time...
شكرًا
Shukran
The next phrase we'll teach you, is perhaps the second most useful phrase of all. It's to apologize or to excuse yourself.
معذرةً
And it means “Sorry” or “Excuse me”.
معذرةً
M’a-dhera-tan
Use this phrase when you want to grab a waiter's attention, or when you're hustling through the busy streets of Cairo!
معذرةً
M’a-dhera-tan
Repeating after Yafa.
معذرةً
M’a-dhera-tan
Your turn!
معذرةً
M’a-dhera-tan
Imagine you're on the street and you want to stop someone to ask them for directions, what do you say...?
معذرةً
M’a-dhera-tan
OK. One last time...
معذرةً
M’a-dhera-tan
Now you can say "thank you", "excuse me", and "sorry" in Arabic. Let's move on.
Where is...?
Asking where something is, is an incredibly important and useful phrase to learn. You're going to need this when asking where the bathroom, the train station, or where the hotel is.
To ask where something is, put "where" first:
أين
Ayyna (Where is..)
and then add the name of the place or location...
For example, if you want to ask "Where is the bathroom?"...
أين الحمام؟
Ayyna al-hamaam? (Where is the bathroom?)
Do you remember emphatic consonants in Arabic? We talked about it briefly in lesson 2 on pronunciation.
The letter ح is pronounced deep in the throat.
Haa'
ح
This sound is pronounced very deep in the throat. You want make an H sound but with the throat constricted a little.
ح
Haa'
One trick to produce this sound, is to push your tongue as far back in your mouth as you can, and then saying the word "hot". It should help you to pronounce this sound.
ح
Haa'
One last time...
ح
الحمام؟
أين الحمام؟
Haa'
al-hamaam (bathroom)
Ayyna al-hamaam? (Where is the bathroom?)
Try saying the complete sentence.
أين الحمام؟
Ayyna al-hamaam? (Where is the bathroom?)
Once more...
أين الحمام؟
Ayyna al-hamaam? (Where is the bathroom?)
Well done! Now if you wanted to ask where the train station is in Arabic, it'll be...
أين محطة القطار؟
Ayyna mahaTet al-qetaar? (Where is the train station?)
أين محطة القطار؟
Ayyna mahaTet al-qetaar? (Where is the train station?)
Repeat it again.
أين محطة القطار؟
Ayyna mahaTet al-qetaar? (Where is the train station?)
So, you can ask where something is, simply by saying...
أين
Ayyna (Where is..)
and then adding the name of the place or location.
So if the word for "hotel" is...
فندق
funduq (hotel)
How would you ask "Where is the hotel?" in Arabic?
First, you would say...
أين
Ayyna (Where is..)
then add "hotel".
فندق
funduq (hotel)
فندق
فندق ماريوت القاهرة
فندق ماريوت القاهرة
funduq (hotel)
funduq Marriott al-qahera (Cairo Marriott Hotel)
funduq Marriott al-qahera (Cairo Marriott Hotel)
"Convenience store" in Arabic is...
بقالة
beqaala (Convenience store)
"Where is the convenience store?" would be...
أين البقالة؟
أين البقالة؟
Ayyna al-beqaala (Where is convenience store?)
Ayyna al-beqaala (Where is convenience store?)
Repeat it one last time...
أين البقالة؟
Ayyna al-beqaala (Where is convenience store?)
You can ask where anything is in Arabic by saying...
أين؟
Ayyna (Where is..)
and then adding the place or location.
In this final lesson, you learned how to say "thank you", "excuse me", "sorry", and to ask where something is in Arabic.
And in this series, we introduced you to the basics of Arabic pronunciation, grammar, writing, and more.
Let's conclude with some parting advice from Yafa, and listen to some of her tips on how to learn Arabic from a native Arabic perspective.
The best way to learn Arabic, particularly if you want to improve your communication skills, is to watch and study contemporary Arabic videos. That's because we often use expressions that aren't necessarily introduced in grammar text books in daily conversation.
I believe that listening to Arabic music is one of the easiest ways to immerse yourself and to learn Arabic. Additionally, music teaches you all sorts of things, including cultural expressions and the values of a community. You get to learn much more than just the language.
Finally, watching contemporary videos – such as our videos here – will ensure that you're learning real, applicable Arabic in the fastest and most effective way.
You've reached the end of this course 'Introduction to Arabic', but it's only the beginning of your journey to Arabic fluency! Where do you go from here? Try our Ultimate Guide to Arabic Pronunciation series where we teach you all the sounds of the Arabic language! Or check out any of our other video series. We have many different categories for you to choose from.
Good luck as you continue learning Arabic, and I'll see you in another video!
Bye!
Bye!

7 Comments

Hide
Please to leave a comment.
😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

ArabicPod101.com Verified
Friday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Where do you go from here? Try our Learn Arabic in Three Minutes series where we teach you beginner vocabulary and even more useful phrases!
https://www.arabicpod101.com/index.php?cat=43

ArabicPod101.com
Wednesday at 06:28 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Kylie,


لا مؤاخذة

is sometimes used as "excuse me". This is an old usage and I personality don't use it in that sense that much anymore.


These days a new usage has been developing though! It is used before you say a curse word or a vulgar word in the sense of "excuse me for using this word:(insert curse word/inappropriate word here)".

When I bump into someone in the street or the train, I personally say:

آسفة

asfah

sorry


Nora

Team ArabicPod101.com

Kylie
Tuesday at 04:50 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Thank you for this helpful video!


When I have studied Egyptian Colloquial Arabic in the past, I have heard this phrase used in instances where you might say "Excuse me" (not sure on the spelling):

لا مواخزا

Is this also appropriate for addressing someone on the streets of Cairo? Could you explain the difference in translation from the example, if any? Does it have to do with the apology in the example?

ArabicPod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:13 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Elizabeth,


It's good to have audio input at a young age though! Also don't underestimate the difference between Lebanese dialects and Modern Standard Arabic. It might make thing seem harder.


Nora

Team ArabicPod101.com

Elizabeth
Saturday at 12:28 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

My Sittoo and Jidoo and their brothers and sisters, etc spoke Arabic around me as a kid and even now. But I never knew how HARD it is to learn.. Ahhhh... I'm Lebanese-American...

ArabicPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 08:56 PM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

Hi Julia,


Thank you for pointing that out. We will work on it!


Nora

Team ArabicPod101.com

julia
Tuesday at 05:16 AM
Your comment is awaiting moderation.

The dialogue explains that the phrase "excuse me" should be used in Cairo, but the transcript indicates "standard." I'm confused. Is this phrase dialect or modern standard Arabic? If it's dialect, why does the transcript say standard? If it's Modern Standard Arabic, why would I want to learn this if it wouldn't be used in everyday life?