Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Hi everyone, and welcome back to ArabicPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 5 - Talking About An Accident in Arabic, Part 1. I’m Becky.
Hany: مرحبا I'm Hany.
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to talk about what you are doing and what someone else is doing or is going to do, using the correct vowelling. The conversation takes place on the beach.
Hany: It's between Tim and Karim.
Becky: The speakers are friends, so they will use informal Arabic. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
(in Hurghada, on the beach)
تيم: أين الجميع يا كريم؟
كريم: إلينور تشتري بعض المشروبات الباردة لأننا عطشانين. أين كنت؟
تيم: كنت أشاهد الشعاب المرجانية في هذه المنطقة. إنها غاية في الجمال! أين سارة و مينا؟
كريم: يا لك من فضولي يا تيم! لا أعرف, أظن أنهم يسبحون هناك.
تيم: لا أراهم.. انتظر لحظة, أليس هذا مينا هناك؟ إنه يحمل سارة على ظهره!
كريم: ماذا قُلت؟! يا ألهي. سارة, مينا, ما الأمر؟ أأنتم بخير؟
سارة: كنت أسبح هناك و فجأة لدغني شيءٌ ما في ساقي اليمنى. لم أستطع أن أسبح لأن الألم كان شديداً فناديت مينا..
كريم: يجب أن نأخذها إلى المستشفى!
Becky: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
(in Hurghada, on the beach)
Tim: Where's everyone, Karim?
Karim: Eleanor is buying some cold drinks because we're thirsty. Where were you?
Tim: I was looking at the coral reefs in this area. They are extremely beautiful! Where are Sara and Mina?
Karim: You are such a nosy person, Tim! I don't know. I think they are swimming over there or something.
Tim: I can't see them... Wait a second. Isn't that Mina over there? He's carrying Sara on his back!
Karim: What did you just say?! Oh my God, Sara, Mina, what's the matter? Are you guys okay?
Sara: I was swimming over there and then suddenly something stung me on my right leg. I couldn't swim because the pain was too much, so I called Mina's name..
Karim: We have to take her to the hospital!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: I wish I could visit the Red Sea coast at least once in my life!
Hany: Becky, you should know that Egypt’s beautiful and inexpensive beach resorts have been vacation destinations for many European tourists, especially Italian and German tourists.
Becky: I think that also summer is pretty long in Egypt, right?
Hany: Right, and these long summers make it possible to take your vacation anytime between June and September. Luxor and Aswan are all-time favorites for Egyptians themselves, and are very popular honeymoon destinations during winter, because they are extremely hot in summer.
Becky: What are the Arabic names for Luxor and Aswan?
Hany: أَسوْان and الأُقصُر
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Hany: عطشان [natural native speed]
Becky: thirsty
Hany: عطشان[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: عطشان [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: الشعاب المرجانية [natural native speed]
Becky: coral reefs
Hany: الشعاب المرجانية[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: الشعاب المرجانية [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: شاهد [natural native speed]
Becky: to watch
Hany: شاهد[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: شاهد [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: فضولي [natural native speed]
Becky: nosy, too curious
Hany: فضولي[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: فضولي [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: ظهر [natural native speed]
Becky: back
Hany: ظهر [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: ظهر [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: الألم [natural native speed]
Becky: the pain
Hany: الألم[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: الألم [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: شيء ما [natural native speed]
Becky: something
Hany: شيء ما[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: شيء ما [natural native speed]
Becky: And last..
Hany: مستشفى [natural native speed]
Becky: hospital
Hany: مستشفى[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: مستشفى [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Hany: انتظر لحظة
Becky: meaning "wait a minute"
Hany: This expression is made up of two words intazir meaning "wait" in the imperative form, and lahzah meaning "a moment". This literally means "wait for one moment", but usually people take their time after saying it. If you are talking to a female, you should say intazirii lahza.
Becky: Can you give us an example using this word?
Hany: Sure. For example, you can say.. انتظر لحظة, أين محفظتي؟
Becky: ..which means "Wait a moment, where is my wallet?" Okay, what's the next phrase?
Hany: يا لك من ..
Becky: meaning "You are such a .."
Hany: This is a set expression followed by an adjective, usually with a negative meaning, like كَذاب, meaning “liar.”
Becky: Since it has a bit of a negative nuance, never use it with older people or people you don't know too well. Can you give us an example?
Hany: Sure. For example, you can say.. إنها مجرد حشرة. يا لك من جبان!
Becky: .. which means "It's just a bug. You're such a scaredy cat!" Okay, what's the next word?
Hany: يا إلهي
Becky: meaning "oh my God"
Hany: This expression consists of two words - ya, which is a vocative article, followed by ilaahi meaning "my God". When something sudden or unexpected or scary happens, this expression is commonly used.
Becky: Can you give us an example using this word?
Hany: Sure. For example, you can say.. يا إلهي, انتبه!
Becky: .. which means "Oh my God, Watch out!"
Becky: Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn how to talk about what you are doing and what someone else is doing or is going to do, and to use the correct vowelling..
Hany: We will discuss the most commonly used present tense forms in Arabic, and also introduce some of the sub-forms we can create using the present tense form.
Becky: Verb forms in Arabic can be categorized into two types according to the number of extra letters after the main 3 letters of the root.
Hany: In the first case, we have the root verb without any extra letters - this form is called fi’l mugarrad فعل مُجَرَّد
Becky: can you give an example?
Hany: كتب or نزل
Becky: Respectively meaning “to go down” and “to write”
Hany: In the second case, we have the root verb followed by extra letters, which change the meaning of the root verb to a variety of other related meanings. In Arabic, this form is called fi’l maziid فِعل مَزيد
Becky: can you give an example?
Hany: أنزل or استخدم.
Becky: which respectively mean “to lower something” and “to use”
Hany: So, keep in mind that any verb in Arabic, except for a very small group of verbs that have a 4-letter-root, will either be fi’l mugarrad without extra letters, or fi’l maziid with 1, 2, or 3 extra letters.
Becky: Adding certain prefixes and suffixes turns a root verb into a present tense form. Hany, can you give us an example?
Hany: Let’s consider the verb كتب, “to write,” and turn it into its present mugarrad form...
Becky: So, the form without extra letters. Let’s see part of the conjugation. Hany will say the Arabic and I’ll give the translation.
Hany: أكتب
Becky: “I write”
Hany: نَكتُب
Becky: “We write”
Hany: تَكتُب
Becky: “You write”
Hany: تَكتُبين
Becky: “You write” in the feminine form
Hany: يَكتُب
Becky: “He writes”
Hany: تَكتُب
Becky: “She writes”
Hany: Notice that in all these forms the extra letters are conjugation prefixes and suffixes, not extra letters that would change the meaning of the verb. That’s why we talk about the mugarrad form.
Becky: Listeners, to see more details about the prefixes and suffixes, check the lesson notes. Hany, are there examples of verbs without extra letters in the dialogue?
Hany: أَظُنُّ إنَّهُم يَسبَحون هناك.
Becky: “I think they are swimming there.”
Hany: Both azunnu and yasbahuuna are in the present tense and in the mugarrad form.
Becky: Now let’s see the other group, the verb made by the root with extra letters.
Hany: the maziid verbs can have either 1, 2, or 3 extra letters other than the root letters, and they have certain forms.
Becky: Ok, let’s give an example.
Hany: Sure, for example for the root كرم (k r m), indicating “generosity”, we can have the maziid form with 1 extra letter يُكرِم (yukrimu), which means “to be generous”.
Becky: Let’s see an example of a root with 2 more extra letters.
Hany: With the root حمر (h m r), indicating “red”, we can have the maziid form with 2 extra letters يحمَرُّ (yahmarru), which means “to turn something red”.
Becky: Now let’s see some of the verbs with extra letters in the dialogue.
Hany: We had إلينور تَشتَري بعض المَشروبات.
Becky: “Eleanor is buying some drinks.”
Hany: The verb tashtari , “is buying”, is in the third person singular feminine form, and is a maziid verb. The root of this verb is ش ر ي with 2 extra letters (ا ت) when rolled back to the masculine past tense اشترى.
Becky: Which is the dictionary form.
Hany: Here is another example from the dialogue كُنت أُشاهِد الشعاب المُرجانية.
Becky: “I was looking at the coral reefs.”
Hany: The verb ushahidu means “look at” or “watch” in the first person singular form. It is a maziid verb with 1 extra letter. The root of this verb is ش ه د, then we added the ا as an extra letter when we rolled back to the masculine past tense form شاهَدَ.
Becky: Ok, finally let’s have a look at the final vowelling of the present tense, which is one of the main forms of the Arabic verb.
Hany: The present tense verb has the vowelling state raf’/رفع just like the two elements of the noun sentence, the mubtada’ and the habar, that we studied in previous lessons.
Becky: that means that we add a dammah vowelling sign on the last letter in three cases - when the verb is in the singular form, if it ends in a consonant, or if it’s in its original form with NO suffixes
Hany: Right, because if it has suffixes, that means that it is in a subform, with different final vowelling rules. Also if it is in the plural or the dual form, always put a fat-ha vowelling sign on the final letter.
Becky: And if it ends in a vowel, just pronounce the vowel as it is, because if a long vowel occurs in the last letter of a word, it doesn’t need a vowelling sign to aid the pronunciation. Ok, let’s wrap up this lesson with a couple of sample sentences in the present form.
Hany: يَلعَبُ مينا كُرَةَ القَدَم كُلَّ أُسبوع.
Becky: "Mina plays soccer every week."
Hany: تَمتَدُّ الصَحراء مِن البَحر الأَحمَر إلى نّهر النيل.
Becky: "The desert extends between the Red sea and the Nile River."

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Hany: شكرا

5 Comments

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ArabicPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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ArabicPod101.com Verified
Tuesday at 01:46 PM
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Hi Gozel,


They are both acceptable plural forms :)!


Nora

Team ArabicPod101.com

Gozel
Thursday at 11:11 PM
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Hello, is it common to use عطشانون? Because dictionary says the plural form of thirsty is عطاش

ArabicPod101.com
Friday at 07:02 AM
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Hi Fiona,


Thank you so much for your feedback!


Nora

Team ArabicPod101.com

Fiona Sophia
Tuesday at 07:40 AM
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Hello!

I think there is a mistake.

9:56 Hani says كتب and it is translated as "I write" even though the real translation would be "I wrote". It should be corrected to Hani saying "أكتب" to fit the lesson.

Love ArabicPod101 though! :)