Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Becky: Hi everyone, and welcome back to ArabicPod101.com. This is Intermediate Season 1 Lesson 14 - What Are Egyptian Weddings Like? I’m Becky.
Hany: مرحبا I'm Hany.
Becky: In this lesson, you’ll learn how to make it clear that you are talking about a certain person by explaining what they are wearing or holding. The conversation takes place at an Egyptian wedding.
Hany: It's between Tim and his classmates.
Becky: The speakers are friends, so they will use casual Arabic. Okay, let's listen to the conversation.
DIALOGUE
تيم: واو. لم أكن أعرف أن الأفراح المصرية صاخبة هكذا.
الزملاء: أتعرف هذه الفتاة التي ترتدي التنورة السوداء القصيرة؟
تيم: نعم. إنها سارة, صديقتي في الجامعة.
الزملاء: ماذا عن تلك الفتاة التي ترتدي الفستان الأحمر؟ تبدو أجنبية.
تيم: آه, هذه إلينور, إنها أسترالية مثلي.
الزملاء: أتعلمون لمن هذه الحقيبة السوداء يا شباب؟
تيم: نعم, إنها حقيبة إلينور! إعطني إياها فأنا لا أجيد الرقص. سأظل هنا و أشاهد.
Becky: Listen to the conversation with the English translation
Tim: Wow. I didn't know Egyptian weddings were so loud like this.
Classmates: Do you know the girl wearing the black mini skirt?
Tim: Yes, that's Sara, my friend from university.
Classmates: What about that girl wearing the red dress? She looks foreign.
Tim: Oh, that's Eleanor. She's Australian like me.
Classmates: Do you know whose bag is this black bag, guys?
Tim: Yes, that's Eleanor's! Give it to me, I can't dance anyway. I'll just sit here and watch.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Becky: Hany, could you tell us something about Egyptian weddings?
Hany: Well, Egyptian weddings are very loud. Usually not only the the groom and the bride’s families are invited, but also many friends.
Becky: Something like a huge sweet 16 party in the United States.
Hany: Right, the same atmosphere, but people of all ages take part. There is an open buffet, or البوفيه, with great amounts of food, drink, and dessert. You’ll also see grandmothers dancing and children running around and jumping to the music.
Becky: Does everybody have to dance?
Hany: Yes, usually, whether you like it or not, you have to dance.
Becky: so it’s better to wear comfortable shoes.
Hany: Right.
Becky: Okay, now onto the vocab.
VOCAB LIST
Becky: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary from this lesson. The first word is..
Hany: فرح [natural native speed]
Becky: wedding
Hany: فرح[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: فرح [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: صاخب [natural native speed]
Becky: loud
Hany: صاخب[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: صاخب [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: ارتدى [natural native speed]
Becky: to wear
Hany: ارتدى[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: ارتدى [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: تنورة [natural native speed]
Becky: skirt
Hany: تنورة[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: تنورة [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: فستان [natural native speed]
Becky: dress
Hany: فستان[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: فستان [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: حقيبة [natural native speed]
Becky: bag
Hany: حقيبة[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: حقيبة [natural native speed]
Becky: Next we have..
Hany: أعطى [natural native speed]
Becky: to give
Hany: أعطى[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: أعطى [natural native speed]
Becky: And last..
Hany: ظل [natural native speed]
Becky: to stay
Hany: ظل[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Hany: ظل [natural native speed]
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Becky: Let's have a closer look at the usage of some of the words and phrases from this lesson. The first phrase is..
Hany: لَم أَكُن أَعرِف
Becky: meaning "I didn't know"
Hany: This expression consists of three words: lam meaning "not", akun meaning "did", and a'rif meaning "I know".
Becky: The whole expression implies that the information you just received is new and that you never heard it before. Can you give us an example using this word?
Hany: Sure. For example, you can say.. لَم أَكُن أَعرِفُ أَنَّكَ تُحِبُّ الرَقص اللاتيني!
Becky: ..which means "I didn't know that you liked Latin dance!" Okay, what's the next word?
Hany: هَكَذا
Becky: meaning "like this"
Hany: Literally hakaza means "like that".
Becky: It’s used as an adverb to a verb. What’s an example using this word?
Hany: For example, you can say.. لا تَتَحَدَّث مَعي هَكَذا!
Becky: .. which means "Don't talk to me like this!" Okay, what's the next phrase?
Hany: ماذا عن..
Becky: meaning "what about.."
Hany: This expression consists of two words: maza meaning "what", and 'an meaning "about".
Becky: You use it when you are talking about a certain thing, and then you change the subject and ask about something else, usually related to the same topic. Can you give us an example using this word?
Hany: Sure. For example, you can say.. ماذا عَن رامي؟ ما رَأيُه؟
Becky: .. which means "What about Ramy? What's his opinion?" Okay, now onto the lesson focus.

Lesson focus

Becky: In this lesson, you'll learn about how to make it clear that you are talking about a certain person by explaining what they are wearing or holding. We’ll first explain the relative pronouns.
Hany: In Arabic they are called الإسم الموصول
Becky: Many times, you are asked to specify what or who you are talking about. In these cases, you have to use relative pronouns, like “that,” “which,” and “whom” in English, to make it obvious that you are talking about a certain thing or person.
Hany: It’s the same in Arabic, but there’s a different relative pronoun for every gender and number of people or things.
Becky: Which are the singular ones?
Hany: The singular masculine is الذي (allaḏii), while the singular feminine is التي (allatii)
Becky: Are there dual pronouns?
Hany: Yes, اللذان (allaḏaan) is the dual masculine and اللتان (allataan) is the dual feminine
Becky: And what about the plural?
Hany: The plural masculine is الذين (allaḏiin) and the plural feminine is اللاتي (allaatii)
Becky: Now, let’s hear the two examples of relative pronouns we had in this dialogue.
Hany: There are two examples for the feminine singular pronoun. One is الفتاة التي ترتدي التنورة. (alfataah allatii tartadii al-tannuurah.)
Becky: meaning “the girl who is wearing the skirt”
Hany: the other is الفتاة التي ترتدي الفستان (al fataah allatii tartadii al fustaan)
Becky: which means “the girl who is wearing the dress.” These two sentences are quite similar. Let’s see how to form a sentence using the singular feminine relative pronoun.
Hany: There are 3 main points to follow.
Becky: The first is that, much like English, you put the noun that you want to specify before the relative pronoun
Hany: in the examples we gave, the noun was al-fataah meaning “the girl”
Becky: The second point is that the sentence after the relative pronoun has to be a verb sentence for the bigger sentence to make sense.
Hany: In the two examples, the verb “to wear,” tardatii, in the present tense was used to form a verb sentence.
Becky: The last point is that you have to conjugate the verb according to the subject gender.
Hany: In the two examples the verb “to wear,” tartadii, is conjugated to the feminine third person, according to the noun before the relative pronoun, which is al-fataah, “the girl.”
Becky: Let’s give some more examples.
Hany: الرجل الذي يقرأ الكتاب وسيم جداً. (al-rajulu alladii yaqra’u al-kitaab wasiimun jiddan.)
Becky: Which means “The man who is reading the book is very handsome.”
Hany: Here is one more example – الطلاب الذين يتحدثون مع الأستاذ يبدون أذكياء. (al-tullaabu alladiina yatahaddathuuna ma’ al-ustaadi yabduuna adkiyaa’.)
Becky: meaning “The students who are talking to the professor look intelligent.” Ok, the second topic for this lesson is color adjectives. More specifically, we will learn the most common color adjectives and how their form changes with gender.
Hany: As you may already know, in Arabic the gender is implied through certain forms in adjectives.
Becky: Let’s give some examples. If I want to say “white” in Arabic, there are two versions
Hany:The masculine, which is أبيض (abyad) and the feminine,which is بيضاء (baydaa’)
Becky: What about “red” in both the masculine and the feminine form?
Hany: The masculine is أحمر (ahmar) and the feminine is حمراء (hamraa’)
Becky: And “blue”?
Hany: أزرق (azraq) is the masculine and زرقاء (zarqaa’) is the feminine
Becky: If you look closely at all the masculine color adjectives, you’ll notice that they follow a certain pattern.
Hany: They all follow the أفعل (af’al) form. Also, when they change into feminine adjectives, they follow a certain pattern, which is the فعلاء (fa’laa’) form.
Becky: These are the forms used for most masculine and feminine adjectives, so it’s useful to memorize them well. Let’s look closely at the examples of color adjectives in the dialogue.
Hany: One is الفستان الأحمر (al fustaan al ahmar)
Becky: meaning “the red dress”
Hany: The noun fustaan meaning “dress” is a masculine noun, so the adjective describing it has to be in the masculine form as well, which is al-ahmar. Another example is الحقيبة السوداء (al haqiibah al-sawdaa’)
Becky: meaning “the black bag”
Hany: Here, the noun al-haqiibah meaning “bag” is a feminine noun, so the adjective describing it has to be in the feminine form also, which is al-sawdaa’.
Becky: Ok, let’s wrap up this lesson with a couple of sample sentences
Hany: أخي هو الفتي الذي يحمل الكتاب الأزرق. (akhii huwa al fataa alladii yahmilu al-kitaabu al-azraq.)
Becky: “My brother is the boy who is holding the blue book.”
Hany: أشتريت سيارة حمراء من أجل عائلتي. (ishtaraytu sayyaratan hamraa’ min ajli ‘aa’ilaty.)
Becky: “I bought a red car for my family.”

Outro

Becky: Okay, that’s all for this lesson. Thank you for listening, everyone, and we’ll see you next time! Bye!
Hany: شكرا

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Can you write a sentence using a relative pronoun?