Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Notes

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Natasha:Hello, It’s me Natasha.
Judith: Absolute Beginner, Season 1, Lesson 21, “Women’s Garments in the Arabic-speaking world.” Hello and welcome to ArabicPod101.com, the fastest, easiest and most fun way to learn Arabic.
Natasha: I’m Natasha and thanks again for being here with us for this Absolute Beginner Season 1 lesson.
Judith: In this lesson, you will learn how to talk about an event.
Natasha: This conversation takes place on the street in Cairo.
Judith: The conversation is between Julia and Maja, they are speaking informal, modern standard Arabic.
DIALOGUES
Natasha: Let’s listen to the conversation.
Natasha:كان الأمر مضحكا. لقد قلت أنك لا تتكلمين العربية، ههها
Natasha: لا أحب هذه المواقف. ذلك الرجل كان مخيفا. كنت أخشى ألا يذهب. كنا محظوظين
Natasha:هل يحدث هذا الأمر كثيرا؟
Natasha: بعض الأحيان. عندما كنت في السعودية كان الرجال أسوأ
Natasha:كل النساء السعوديات يرتدين الحجاب، أليس كذلك؟
Natasha: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Natasha:كان الأمر مضحكا. لقد قلت أنك لا تتكلمين العربية، ههها
Natasha: لا أحب هذه المواقف. ذلك الرجل كان مخيفا. كنت أخشى ألا يذهب. كنا محظوظين
Natasha:هل يحدث هذا الأمر كثيرا؟
Natasha: بعض الأحيان. عندما كنت في السعودية كان الرجال أسوأ
Natasha:كل النساء السعوديات يرتدين الحجاب، أليس كذلك؟
Natasha: Now, let’s hear it with the English translation.
Natasha:كان الأمر مضحكا. لقد قلت أنك لا تتكلمين العربية، ههها
Natasha: That was funny. You said you don’t speak Arabic.
Natasha: لا أحب هذه المواقف. ذلك الرجل كان مخيفا. كنت أخشى ألا يذهب. كنا محظوظين
Natasha: I don’t like these situations. That man was creepy, I was afraid he wouldn’t go away. We were lucky.
Natasha:هل يحدث هذا الأمر كثيرا؟
Natasha: Does this thing happen often?
Natasha: بعض الأحيان. عندما كنت في السعودية كان الرجال أسوأ
Natasha: Sometimes. When I was in Saudi Arabia, the men were worse.
Natasha:كل النساء السعوديات يرتدين الحجاب، أليس كذلك؟
Natasha: Saudi women all wear the hijab, no?.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Judith: Okay, maybe we should explain a bit about the hijab and the different kinds of religious clothing.
Natasha: The hijab is the head scarf worn by many Muslim women as a part of their everyday attire.
Judith: Its original function was to cover women’s hair as directed in the Quran and also in the Old Testament for Jews.
Natasha: In some countries such as Iran, it is compulsory while in others such as Egypt and Turkey, it is banned in public institutions like universities.
Judith: It is common throughout the Muslim world and is often seen as an extension of fashionable dress by young Muslims rather than a religious requirement.
Natasha: In addition to the hijab, some women also wear the niqab. This covers the rest of the face and is mainly restricted to the Gulf, although it is spreading. Even more restrictive is the Pashtun Burqa which is all-in-one garment which completely covers the entire body. This has no real equivalent in the Arab world.
Judith: Another non-Arab word you may hear in regard to Muslim dress is chador which is the fancy word for the loose garment which Iranian women are supposed to wear.
VOCAB LIST
Judith: Let’s take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson. The first word we shall see is?
Natasha: أمر
Judith: Thing or affair.
Natasha: أمر
Judith: Next.
Natasha: مضحك
Judith: Funny.
Natasha: مضحك
Judith: Next.
Natasha: موقف
Judith: Situation.
Natasha: موقف
Judith: Next.
Natasha: مخيفة
Judith: Scary.
Natasha: مخيفة
Judith: Next.
Natasha: مـحـظوظة
Judith: Lucky.
Natasha: مـحـظوظة
Judith: Next.
Natasha: حدث
Judith: To happen.
Natasha: حدث
Judith: Next.
Natasha: Sometimes.
Judith: بعض الأحيان
Natasha: Next.
Judith: السعودية
Natasha: Saudi Arabia.
Judith: السعودية
Natasha: Next.
Judith: أَسوأ
Natasha: Worse.
Judith: أَسوأ
Natasha: Next.
Judith: ارتدى
Natasha: To wear.
Judith: ارتدى
Natasha: Next.
Judith: حجاب
Natasha: Hijab.
Judith: حجاب
KEY VOCAB AND PHRASES
Judith: Let’s have a closer look at the usage for some of the words and phrases from this lesson.
Natasha: The first phrase we’ll look at is, "kuntu 'akhsha 'ilaa yadhhab", means, “I was afraid he wouldn’t go away.” Literally, it’s much simple than the English sentence though it’s just “I was afraid without he goes.” The word "'amr", “thing, affair” is used more often than in English. For example, we saw it in the first sentence, kaana al'amru muDHkaan, which literally means, “that thing was funny.” In English, you just say, “It was funny.”
GRAMMAR POINT
Natasha: The focus of this lesson is the past tense of the verb “to be.” The Arabic verb “to be” is irregular in the past tense.
Judith: The endings are still mostly the same as for regular verbs but the stem changes from kunt- to kaan- for the third person. Can you give us the complete forms please?
Natasha: “I was” kunt, “you were” male kunt, “you were” female kunti, “he was” kaan, she was kaanat, “we were” kunnaa, “you were” kuntum,”they were” kaanuu.
Judith: Say them all again?
Natasha: kunt, kunt, kunti, kaan, kaanat, kunnaa, kuntum, kaanuu.
Judith: That just about does it for today.

Outro

Judith: Listeners, have you ever dreamed for starring in one of our lessons?
Natasha: If your answer is yes, use the voice recording tool on the lessons page.
Judith: Record your voice with a click of a button and then play it back just as easily.
Natasha: Then compare it to the native speakers in the lesson.
Judith: And adjust your pronunciation.
Natasha: After a few tries, you’ll be speaking better or better than Judith here.
Judith: Hey.
Natasha: Go to Arabicpod101.com and rapidly improve your Arabic pronunciation.
Judith:So, see you next week!

5 Comments

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ArabicPod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Would you use hijab to stop the attencion of creepy man ?

ArabicPod101.com
Friday at 09:03 AM
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Hi Vincent,


This is a very good question.

When the verb (in this case "was") comes in the beginning of the sentence, or in other words in verbal sentences, the verb always comes in the singular form. So if I were to say "The men eat", that would be:

يأكل الرجال.


but if you change it into a nominal sentence, where the noun comes first, it becomes:

الرجال يأكلون.


Nora

Team ArabicPod101.com

Vincent
Tuesday at 12:25 AM
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I have a question about the grammar of the second last sentence in the dialogue. The girl says,

كان الرجال أسو

The subject الرجال is plural, but the verb كان is singular, أليس كذلك؟

ArabicPod101.com Verified
Thursday at 09:39 AM
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Hello Grant,


Thank you for your comment and for being a nice person :smile:

Please let us know if you have any question.


Regards,

Laura

Team ArabicPod101.com

Grant Goodman
Tuesday at 04:05 AM
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No, because I'm a good man lol.